Learn from the ENS airdrop

Sure enough, ENS was airdropped. Its rules are very interesting and worth learning:

The airdrop will be allocated to the registered or currently valid “.eth” second-level domain name registration address. The weight of the airdrop is mainly calculated based on the number of accounts, not the number of domain names. The formula is 0.27 multiplied by the number of days to hold at least 1 ENS domain name, plus Multiply 0.067 by the number of days until the domain name expires (up to 8 years). If the account is additionally set up with reverse resolution, the above result will be multiplied by 2.

For ENS, it definitely wants to vote for real users of domain names as much as possible, rather than speculators who speculate domain names.

I think this rule can achieve this, let’s look at it sentence by sentence:

The airdrop will be allocated to the registered address of the second-level domain name “.eth” that has been registered or is currently valid

On the one hand, taking care of early users, ENS was launched in 2017, and most of the early domain names should have expired. On the other hand, if you only look at the existing valid addresses, the total number will be relatively small and not enough for airdrops.

The weight of the airdrop is mainly calculated based on the number of accounts, not the number of domains

Normal users usually have one domain name under one account, and only speculators who speculate domain names will stock up a bunch of domain names, which greatly weakens the weight of speculators .

The formula is 0.27 multiplied by the number of days to hold at least 1 ENS domain name,

It is beneficial to early participants, OG, who hold more days. It costs money to hold ENS every day, and the distribution by day is also very reasonable.

Plus 0.067 times the number of days before the domain name expires (up to 8 years)

Balancing the previous one is conducive to current valid domain names, especially long-term domain names that have been purchased (usually for their own use).

However, this weight is low, only 1/4 of the previous one. For the wool party Airdrop Farmer that emerged this year, they have fewer days and will not register domain names for many years. They may spend money to brush 10 domain names, but none of them can compare to one. Users who have expired a long time ago have high weights.

If the account is additionally set up with reverse analysis, the above result will be multiplied by 2

This sentence is the essence. The so-called reverse analysis (Reverse Record) refers to the mapping of Address -> Name, and an account can only have one. Usually only the domain name you use will be set to reverse resolution, otherwise it is unnecessary (of my own domains, only the one I use most often has reverse resolution). Domain speculators will not set this up. So this further increases the weight of real users and weakens the weight of speculators .

To sum up, this airdrop rule is simple and effective, making good use of the project’s own characteristics to screen currency holders. I don’t think there is a high probability that dydx will be a billionaire with 800 addresses in an instant.

In addition, I also thought of a few interesting questions:

  • If you were  Opensea , who/how would you vote for?
  • If you were  Opyn , who/how would you vote for?
  • If you were  Metamask , who/how would you vote for?

Posted by:CoinYuppie,Reprinted with attribution to:https://coinyuppie.com/learn-from-the-ens-airdrop/
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