CC0 NFTs: A Large Experiment on Shared Intellectual Property and Benefits

This is a radical commitment to give up the last bit of control over the real world market and let the masses share everything, thus creating a completely decentralized brand where anyone can modify and use the knowledge of the CC0 project in any way Property rights and profit from them, no license required.

The NFT field can always usher in new developments in unexpected ways, and this time the protagonist is CC0 NFT (Creative Commons 0 NFT).

Creative Commons 0 (creative commons–no rights reserved) is called “shared intellectual property without any rights reserved”, that is, property rights belong to the public domain and can be used by anyone.

The combination of CC0 and NFT is equivalent to open-source intellectual property (open-source IP) based on the traceability function of the blockchain. The creator allows others to own their NFT and use it for commercial purposes in any way without attributing the proceeds to the original creation. or team. This enables CC0 NFT to accumulate traffic and attention at a high speed, thereby attracting a large number of funds and creative talents, which can promote the development of more innovative projects.

CC0 NFTs: A Large Experiment on Shared Intellectual Property and Benefits

Before the introduction of CC0 in the NFT field, the controversy over digital rights in the blockchain initially broke out over copyright restrictions by Yuga Labs and Larva Labs. Larva Labs restricts the holders of its Crypto Punks from making derivative products or using its brand, which is considered to protect its own brand, so that Larva Labs itself can directly cooperate with other companies and brands to obtain greater benefits. This sparked dissatisfaction among the holders, causing some of them to abandon the project.

In contrast, Yuga Labs grants its BAYC NFT holders greater intellectual property freedom and commercial rights, allowing them to use the purchased NFT artwork itself to create and sell derivative products, but cannot use BAYC’s brand name and Logo, for example: people who have purchased BAYC NFT can print the NFT’s image on T-shirts for sale, but if the BAYC logo and brand name are also printed, this is not allowed. That is to say, firstly, the right to create derivatives is only granted to BAYC NFT holders; secondly, holders are restricted from using BAYC’s brand name and logo.

Dissatisfaction with copyright restrictions such as Yuga Labs and Larva Labs has led to the explosion of CC0 NFTs (Creative Commons 0 NFTs), and NFT projects such as Mfers, Cryptoadz, Blitmap and Nouns provide holders with more radical freedoms : You can not buy NFT, you can transform the picture at will, you can use the logo and brand, and you can even hand-paint one in the real world and sell it.

CC0 is actually an intellectual property standard born in the real world. Copyright law in the past automatically granted copyright protection to works of art, whether the artist wanted those rights or not. To make some changes to this law, the US non-profit Creative Commons released the licensing standard CC0 in 2009, which allows creators to declare that their work is in the public domain. The creators of CC0-marked works voluntarily relinquish ownership in the legal sense, allowing anyone to adapt and use the works for commercial purposes. It embodies a new model of “no rights reserved”, unlike those sites plastered with “property reserved” disclaimers.

Combining CC0 and NFT is a large-scale copyright experiment. Although the blockchain further frees creators and consumers to determine the ownership model of their works, it is limited to virtual networks or Metaverses, because unalterable ownership only exists in the digital realm and cannot be controlled The real world market; and if the CC0 license is used on an NFT project, it means: the project provides the holder with an additional guarantee that the shared ownership model of its works can be extended to the real world. This is a radical commitment to give up the last bit of control over the real world market and let the masses share everything, thus creating a completely decentralized brand where anyone can modify and use the knowledge of the CC0 project in any way Property rights and profit from them, no license required.

Perhaps the best example of this is the CC0 NFT project Nouns, which is less than a year old, which has inspired 130 derivative on-chain projects and real-world commodities, all of which help underpin its brand value. And do these derivatives creators own Nouns’ NFTs? uncertain. But here’s the thing: nobody cares.

Considering whether a project is suitable for adopting CC0 mainly depends on the nature of the NFT project and the goals of the creator. The CC0 project is more suitable for lower fidelity base layer NFTs as it allows for a wider range of authoring by third parties. This makes pixel art projects like Cryptoadz or Nouns, or projects with only a “base skeleton” like Loot, ideal for CC0 licensing. For this reason, CC0 is probably the most unsuitable for projects that require full control over details that take a long time to build a brand story.

CC0 NFTs: A Large Experiment on Shared Intellectual Property and Benefits

Another “incredible” CC0 project is Mfers. Mfers has risen to No. 42 on OpenSea’s all-time sales charts, which even the crypto community finds incredible, because Mfers has everything people hate about NFTs: simple, crude artworks sold at prices that almost insult IQ. However, like many success stories in the crypto space, there are more complex reasons behind it. 

Behind Mfers’ meme art is a revolution in intellectual property. The CC0 NFT project is in the public domain, its creators do not own the images, people are free to use the Mfers brand. The idea is that if the Mfers brand grows, the owners of Mfers will profit from it even if no one owns the rights to it. Essentially, it’s an experiment to see if it’s possible to accomplish a “crowdfunding model” of brand building.

CC0 NFTs: A Large Experiment on Shared Intellectual Property and Benefits

Although controversial, the benefits of CC0 are obvious. First, art always triumphs where the many create, not the few.Marvel and DC, which are well-developed in the real world, only own the basic intellectual property of their characters, often ceding creative control and licensing rights to various third-party writers and filmmakers.

Second, CC0 skeptics underestimate that even the richest film industry or video game world is not designed by a creative mind alone. For example, Star Wars borrowed ideas from some Japanese movies; some of Marvel’s most popular superheroes, such as Thor and Loki, were also created based on ideas in the public domain. 

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, blockchain technology is coming our way. Remember that art can be copied quickly without blockchain, but it is difficult for creators to establish ownership and profit. A public decentralized distributed ledger allows the public to record the creator of each derivative in an organized and neutral manner, and to distinguish the dissemination of each work and generate revenue, without having to rely on an administrative legal system .

Posted by:CoinYuppie,Reprinted with attribution to:https://coinyuppie.com/cc0-nfts-a-large-experiment-on-shared-intellectual-property-and-benefits/
Coinyuppie is an open information publishing platform, all information provided is not related to the views and positions of coinyuppie, and does not constitute any investment and financial advice. Users are expected to carefully screen and prevent risks.

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